Recipe – Sweet Potato Breakfast Bowls with Spinach and Avocado

Start your day the right way.

Did you buy too many sweet potatoes for Thanksgiving? Use your leftovers to prepare this breakfast bowl that’ll keep you filled all morning long.

Switch the bagel and cream cheese for this dish that is full of protein and can be thrown together in less than five minutes (if you roast the sweet potatoes ahead of time). This dish makes a healthy alternative for this busy time of the year.

Remember, breakfast is the most important meal of the day, so start your day the right way with great nutrition.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large sweet potato (orange yam kind), roasted
  • 1 TBSP olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups baby spinach
  • ¼ cup cooked quinoa
  • 2 eggs (fried, or poached)
  • ½ avocado, sliced
  • Salt and cracked pepper to taste

For Serving:

  • Sunflower seeds, chia seeds
  • Hot sauce
  • Greek yogurt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Toss sweet potato, oil, salt and pepper on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast, tossing occasionally, until tender and browned, 35 to 45 minutes. Set aside until ready to use.
  2. In a large skillet, add the oil and heat to medium-low. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant for about 1 minute. Add the spinach and stir for about 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. Place spinach in bowl. Add cooked quinoa. Add sweet potato, avocado and eggs.

Serve with sunflower seeds, chia seeds, hot sauce and/or a dollop of plain Greek yogurt.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Recipe: Sherry-Braised Chicken and Mushrooms

Nutritious seared chicken.

This protein-packed, sherry-braised chicken and mushroom recipe is nutritious and ready in less than 30 minutes.

Between family obligations, kids’ homework, errands and appointments, today is harder than ever to find time to cook. This recipe combines seared chicken with mushrooms for a healthy and quick meal that will satisfy your hunger, and it will provide all the protein you need in less than 30 minutes.

The combination of dry sherry and mushrooms will create the perfect flavor to make your mouth water. Pair it with a spinach salad and brown rice and have a healthy, complete meal for any night of the week.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)
40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 3 servings.)
1 lb. Chicken breast tenders
Salt and pepper to taste
Small amount of flour for dredging
2 TBSP Olive oil
½ lb. Fresh mushrooms, thinly sliced
½ Small onion, halved and thinly sliced
2 Celery stalks, thinly sliced on a diagonal
 ¼ cup  Chicken broth
 ¼ cup Dry sherry or white wine
 ¼ cup Dried tarragon

Spread flour on a flat work surface. Dip chicken in flour on both sides, set aside, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, then add oil. When hot, add chicken in a single layer and brown on one side. Turn chicken over, continue cooking until cooked through, about 6-7 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

Add mushrooms, onion and celery to skillet. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are tender, about 5-7 minutes. Add broth, sherry and tarragon, and raise heat to high. Cook and stir until sauce is reduced and thickened to a few tablespoons, about 2 minutes. Return chicken to the pan and stir gently to coat with the sherry glaze.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with a spinach salad and brown rice. See Meal Builder for amounts for your Plan.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Recipe: Mustard-Baked Salmon

Salmon is a good source of protein.

Mustard and lime are the perfect ingredients to prepare this mouthwatering salmon in less than 20 minutes, from start to finish.

The preparation couldn’t be easier. It’s a healthy and easy 400-calorie recipe for a casual family dinner or a special occasion. Cook to impress. Pair it with a green salad and baked sweet potato and make this dish part of your healthy dinner.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)
40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 3 servings.)
2 tsp Olive oil
1 ¼ lb. (about 600 g) Center-cut wild salmon filet
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup (75 g) Plain Greek-style yogurt
2 TBSP Stone-ground mustard
2 tsp Fresh lemon juice
½ tsp Dried tarragon

Preheat broiler. Line a baking sheet with foil, and coat lightly with 2 teaspoons olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on the baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, stir together the yogurt, mustard, lemon juice and tarragon. Spread evenly on top of the salmon. Place salmon under the broiler, about 5 inches (about 15 centimeters) away from the heat, and broil until cooked through, about 10-12 minutes.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with green beans, baked sweet potato and tossed green salad. See Meal Builder for amounts for your Plan.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Four Ways to Declutter Your Diet

Get rid of the calorie clutter in your beverages.

Clean eating is trendy, but maybe you just need to declutter instead.

The phrase “clean eating” is pretty popular these days, but the concept isn’t really new.  In general, clean eating means eating foods that are fairly close to their natural state – that is, minimally processed – and getting rid of the excess ‘clutter’ in the form of a lot of added fats, sugars, salt and unnecessary additives.  Cooking foods at home and sourcing fresh, local ingredients is often part of the mix, too.  Overall, clean eating is meant to call more awareness to what we’re putting in our bodies.

It’s a great concept, but let’s not get carried away.  First of all, no one would argue that whole, unprocessed foods without packaging or labels are anything but good choices.  But creating a daily diet made up of only those foods might be intimidating to those who simply need to get a meal on the table at the end of a busy day.  Besides, there are plenty of healthy, wholesome – and yes, even ‘clean’ – foods that come in packages;  frozen loose pack veggies and fruits, canned tuna, salmon or beans, brown rice or whole grain pasta, just to name a few.

Some people take the concept of clean eating a little further, and decide to jump-start their regimen with a short fast.  Some say it feels like they’re giving their system a fresh start – kind of like cleaning out your closets or changing the oil in your car.  Fasting for a couple of days probably won’t do you any harm as long as you’re healthy and you keep yourself well-hydrated..

But keep in mind that our bodies naturally clean and detoxify every day.  We eliminate and neutralize not only via the digestive tract, but the liver, kidneys, lungs and skin get into the act, too.  As long as you take good care of your body and provide it with plenty of nourishing foods, it will take care of you.

So if you’re already eating plenty of fruits and veggies (even if they’ve been frozen), whole  grains (yep, even those that come packaged in a plastic bag) and lean proteins (even those that come from a can), your diet might be pretty clean already.  And even if you’re not eating this way, maybe you don’t need to do a “clean sweep” – perhaps a little “decluttering” is all it takes.

How to Declutter Your Diet

  • Read food labels to help you ditch extra sugar, salt and fat. You’ve heard it before, but it’s generally true – shorter ingredients lists usually mean fewer unwanted additives and more wholesome products.  Check labels for added fats, salt and sugar, and do your best to choose items that have minimal amounts added.  For example, choose plain yogurt rather than pre-sweetened, choose plain frozen vegetables rather than those with sauces added, look for whole grain breads or cereals with little to no added sugar.
  • Lose the refined starches and up your fruit and veggie intake. This sounds so simple, but it’s one of the best things you can do to improve the overall quality of your diet. When you make a point to include a fruit or vegetable at every meal, it “squeezes out” many of the unwanted foods and ingredients you might otherwise eat.  Swap sugary, fatty ice cream for a delicious bowl of berries, have a side salad with your sandwich instead of fries, or try snacking on baby carrots and hummus instead of chips.
  • Get rid of the calorie clutter in your beverages. When it comes to added calories, beverages are – for many people – their undoing.  Between sugary sodas, fruit juices (yes, even 100%, fresh-pressed, all-organic!), alcoholic beverages and fancy coffee drinks, it’s not hard to take in hundreds of calories a day from beverages alone.  Plain tea is a great alternative because it can be drunk hot or cold, it has no calories, and has naturally-occurring compounds that may offer some health benefits, too.
  • Clear the clutter from your fridge, freezer and pantry. A little kitchen ‘spring cleaning’ can really help you declutter your diet.  Fill your pantry with high-fiber whole grains (like 100% whole wheat pasta, bread, cereals and flour, as well as foods like quinoa, millet and brown rice) instead of the refined stuff. Stock up on beans and canned tomatoes instead of prepared spaghetti sauces or soups that are high in salt. Stock your refrigerator and freezer with plain fruits and veggies, rather than those with sugary syrups or salty, fatty sauces. And keep some canned tuna or salmon on hand in the pantry, or frozen fish filets or chicken breasts in the freezer for quick, healthy (clean!) meals, rather than frozen chicken nuggets or breaded fish sticks.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Recipe: Juicy Pork Tenderloin

Healthy, protein-packed pork.

 This protein-packed, grilled pork tenderloin recipe, full of flavor and with only 400 calories, will melt in your mouth.

This amazing grilled pork tenderloin recipe is moist, full of flavor and only 400 calories. There is no major preparation – just a quick dry rub.  Pork tenderloin is one of the easiest meats to cook and one of the leanest, but you must be careful not to overcook it, or it will be dry. This recipe will seal in the juices, and the meat will melt in your mouth. It’s the perfect protein to pair with some veggies and pasta.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)
40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 3 servings.)
1 (about 1 ¼ lb.) Pork tenderloin
2 TBSP Olive oil, divided
1 tsp Salt
½ tsp Freshly ground pepper
1 tsp Brown sugar
½ tsp Ground cumin
½ tsp Dry mustard
¼ tsp Garlic powder

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Trim tenderloin of any fat and silver “skin,” and pat dry with paper towels. Pierce in a few places with a fork and coat with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In a small bowl, mix together salt, pepper, brown sugar, cumin, mustard and garlic powder. Coat pork tenderloin with the seasoning mixture.

Heat large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil and sear pork on all sides until nicely browned, about 7-8 minutes. Place skillet in preheated oven for 10-15 minutes, or until meat reaches an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Transfer pork to a cutting board and let rest for 5-10 minutes, then slice into small medallions across the grain.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with steamed broccoli and whole grain pasta.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Recipe: Tuna Patties

Tuna patties are healthy and budget-friendly.

 Tuna patties, tuna cakes and tuna croquets are budget-friendly, and a healthy way to get your protein.

A few cans of tuna, some vegetables, lemon juice, mustard, Greek yogurt and bread crumbs are all the ingredients you need to prepare this budget-friendly recipe. You probably heard of tuna patties, tuna cakes or tuna croquets. Whatever you want to call them, they are done in less than 30 minutes; easy to make, full of flavor and LOTS of protein.

The lemon in this recipe is the secret ingredient to make it go from yum to yummy and the go-to-dish for those lazy days or a quick weeknight meal.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)
40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 3 servings.)
3 cans (5 oz. each) Chunk light or albacore tuna
½ cup (75 g) Diced mixed vegetables
(i.e., red bell pepper, spring onions, cucumber)
2 TBSP Lemon juice
¼ cup Plain Greek-style yogurt
2 TBSP Dijon-style mustard
¼ cup Dry whole wheat bread crumbs
2 tsp Olive oil or canola oil for cooking

Drain liquid from canned tuna, put into a bowl, then flake with a fork.

Set aside. In another bowl, mix together the diced vegetables, lemon juice, yogurt, mustard and bread crumbs until well blended, then add tuna and mix well. Shape into 4 large or 6 small patties.

Heat a non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat and add olive or canola oil. Gently place the patties in the pan and cook until nicely browned on one side, then turn and cook the other side until the patties are browned on both sides and heated through.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with a whole grain bun, raw vegetables and hummus dip.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Tune Up Your Immune System With Healthy Nutrition

Fruits and veggies promote a strong immune system.

When my kids were little, I always braced myself for the ‘back-to-school cold’ that swept through the house during their first week back in the classroom. With the new school year upon us, kids are going to be bringing home more than just homework and new friends.
They’re sure to bring home plenty of germs, too. Even if you don’t have kids at home, you’re still more likely to get sick as the weather turns colder. So, now is a good time to look at all you can do nutritionally to help keep your immune system running in tip-top shape.

Despite what your parents or grandparents might have told you, you don’t catch cold from being out in the cold air (or, as my mother always insisted, from going outdoors with wet hair). But when the weather turns chilly, we spend more time indoors. That means we’re in closer contact with more people and there’s less air circulating, so we’ve got more exposure to the germs that can make us sick. 

Your body has a built-in defense, of course—your immune system. It’s your own personal army of ‘soldiers’ that protects your body by identifying anything foreign—from a virus to a bacteria to a parasite—and then seeking it out and destroying it. Your body does rely on good nutrition and a healthy lifestyle to keep your defenses up. For one thing, if you eat a healthy diet and take care of yourself, you’re more likely to maintain your good health.

Fruits and vegetables are key players because they provide an abundance of phytonutrients—natural compounds found in all plant foods that help to promote health by serving as antioxidants. You need antioxidants to balance out the processes in your body that cause oxidation. Oxidative processes are a normal part of metabolism, but oxidation can run rampant in cells if it’s not kept in check. And that can weaken the body’s ability to fight illness. So, your body relies on a steady source of antioxidants from fruits and veggies to reduce this oxidant stress and, in turn, help to support immune function.

Your immune system also has some ‘special forces’ in the form of white blood cells. These cells produce specialized proteins called antibodies that seek out and destroy invading viruses and bacteria. Since antibodies are proteins, you need adequate protein in the diet to ensure you’ll be able to manufacture the antibodies your body needs. Healthy protein foods—like fish, poultry, lean meats, soy foods and low-fat dairy products—provide the building blocks that your body needs to make these specialized proteins.

Keeping your digestive system healthy is also important in supporting immune function. Your digestive tract is home to trillions of bacteria that have numerous functions in promoting health. Some strains of bacteria help you digest the fiber in your foods, others consume intestinal gas, while others produce vitamins, like vitamin K and vitamin B12. When your system is populated with these ‘good’ bacteria, they also serve to ‘crowd out’ the potentially harmful bacteria that might enter your digestive tract. Some of the best sources of these friendly bacteria are cultured dairy products, like yogurt and kefir.

Eating well really does pave the road to good health. To help your body in the fight against foreign invaders, your internal ‘army’ needs the best nutrition possible. So, call in the troops—and dry your hair.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

How Good Nutrition Supports Your Immune System

A strong immune system relies on a healthy diet for support. Here are some nutrition tips to help you keep your immune system in tip-top shape.

When you stop to think about how hard your immune system works for you, it’s nothing short of amazing. It’s an incredibly complex system that works nonstop to protect and defend you. And it’s a system that depends on good nutrition in order to function properly.

We tend to focus on immunity more in the colder months. It seems that colder weather and illness go hand-in-hand. Part of the reason is that when the weather turns chilly, we spend more time indoors. That means we’re in closer contact with more people, and there’s less air circulating so we’ve got more exposure to the germs that can make us sick.

But that doesn’t mean our immune system isn’t on alert the rest of the year. Your built-in defense system works 24/7. In essence, your immune system is your own personal army of ‘soldiers.’ They protect your body by identifying anything foreign, from a virus to a bacteria to a parasite, and then seeking it out and destroying it.

And your body depends on the proper nutrients and a healthy lifestyle to keep your defenses up.

Good Nutrition and Your Immune System
Your immune system has some ‘special forces’ in the form of white blood cells. These cells produce specialized proteins called antibodies that seek out and destroy invading viruses and bacteria. Since antibodies are proteins, you need adequate protein in the diet to ensure you’ll be able to manufacture the antibodies your body needs. Healthy protein foods, like fish, poultry, lean meats, soy foods and low-fat dairy products, provide the building blocks that your body needs to make these specialized proteins.

Fruits and vegetables are key players in immune system health, because they’re great sources of vitamins A and C, as well as phytonutrients. Vitamin C encourages your body to produce antibodies, and vitamin A supports the health of your skin and tissues of your digestive tract and respiratory system. All of these act as first lines of defense against foreign invaders. Many of the phytonutrients found in fruits and veggies act as antioxidants, which can help to reduce oxidative stress on the body that may weaken your body’s ability to fight of illness.

Keeping your digestive system healthy is also important in supporting immune function. Your digestive tract is home to trillions of bacteria that have numerous functions in promoting health. Some strains of bacteria help you digest the fiber in your foods, others consume intestinal gas, while others produce vitamins like vitamin K and vitamin B12.

When your system is populated with these “good” bacteria, they also serve to crowd out the potentially harmful bacteria that might enter your digestive tract. Some of the best sources of these friendly bacteria are cultured dairy products, like yogurt and kefir. As you know, whenever you’re trying something new, make sure to check with your doctor or other professional about the amount to take that’s right for you.

Some people suffer medical conditions that affect the operation of their immune systems. Diet alone won’t improve the function of a compromised immune system. But for healthy people, eating well can help keep your immune system healthy and strong. To help your body in the fight against foreign invaders, your internal ‘army’ needs the best nutrition possible. So call in the troops!

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Carrot-Cumin Salad

Carrots… a versatile vegetable.

Carrots are healthy and delicious. This 400-calorie carrot-cumin salad will change the way you feel about carrots.

Carrots are the main ingredient for this salad, but cumin, parsley, garlic and lemon add a burst of flavor. It features the citric flavor of lemons, offset by the zest of cumin, garlic and crisp-tender carrots boiled to perfection.

This 400-calorie side is perfect to be served with roasted turkey and wild rice. So don’t let it fool you. Carrots can be healthy, delicious and the perfect complement for many meals.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal                                                     40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)                                                                 (Divide into 3 servings.)

6 Large carrots, peeled and thinly sliced on a diagonal
¼ cup Fresh lemon juice
1 Garlic clove, finely minced
½ tsp Ground cumin
½ tsp Paprika
¼ tsp Ground cinnamon
Salt and pepper to taste
2 TBSP Extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup Fresh cilantro or parsley leaves

In a large saucepan of boiling salted water, cook carrots until crisp-tender, 1-2 minutes. Drain in a colander, rinse under cold water until cool, and drain well. In a medium bowl, whisk together lemon juice, garlic, cumin, paprika and cinnamon, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Whisking constantly, slowly add olive oil. Add carrots and cilantro or parsley to dressing, toss to combine.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with roasted turkey and wild rice.
See Meal Builder for amounts for your Plan.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Spicy Citrus Shrimp

Protein and vegetables in one dish.

Shrimp and sautéed onions with citrus and spice will make this entrée a favorite; 25 grams of protein and only 400 calories.

Orange and red peppers are the perfect ingredients to prepare this delicious and colorful dish. The contrasting flavors of citrus and spicy combined with shrimp and sautéed onions will make this entrée a favorite for the whole family, even for a weeknight meal. Complement with a green salad or steamed quinoa and have a balanced meal in 30 minutes or less.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal                                           40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)                                                       (Divide into 3 servings.)

3 Oranges
1 TBSP Olive oil
1 Red bell pepper, sliced into thin strips
1 1/2 lb. (675 g) Large shrimp, shelled and deveined
1/2 tsp Salt
1/4 tsp Red pepper flakes
3 Green onions, chopped

Grate 1 teaspoon orange peel from one orange, then squeeze out ¼ cup orange juice and set aside. Peel remaining oranges, slice, cut slices in half and set aside. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, then add oil. When hot, add bell pepper and sauté for a few minutes until they begin to soften. Add shrimp, salt, red pepper flakes and orange juice, and continue to cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring, until shrimp is opaque and fully cooked. Remove from heat, stir in reserved orange slices, and scatter green onions on top.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with a green salad and steamed quinoa.
See Meal Builder for amounts for your Plan.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

North Beach Nutrition - San Clemente Nutrition Bar - Offering Healthy Smoothies - Hot & Cold Tea - and Health Coaching To Help You Reach Your Fitness Goals. 1502 N El Camino Real San Clemente CA 92672