Recipe: South of the Border Sizzling Beef Fajitas

A taste of the south.

Fajitas are an easy-to-make Mexican dish. This colorful recipe is full of protein, vegetables and a delicious Latin flavor. So no need to head down to Mexico, this recipe brings the country’s delicious flavors to you.

 

 

Ingredients:

1 tsp cumin
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp salt
1 lb. lean beef steak, flank steak or top sirloin

Rub spice mix over steak.

Marinade

1 TBSP Worcestershire sauce
1 TBSP olive oil
2 TBSP lime juice
1 clove garlic, minced

Pour half of this marinade over the meat and set the other half aside. Cover with plastic wrap. Let marinate in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 large onion. Cook for several minutes, stirring, until soft.

Add

1 green bell pepper
1 red bell pepper

Cook for several more minutes until peppers are soft.

Add

1 tsp cumin
1 clove garlic, minced

Stir until vegetables are softened, about 5 to 6 minutes. Pour in remaining marinade and stir for a minute or two. Cover and remove from heat. Remove meat from marinade and pat dry.

Add

1 TBSP olive oil

Cook steak 3 to 4 minutes on each side, until medium rare. Transfer to a cutting board. Cover with foil and let rest for 10 minutes. Thinly slice meat across the grain into strips. Toss meat and juices from cutting board into the pan with vegetables. Spoon meat-vegetable mixture into tortillas.

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Recipe: Sweet and Sour Lettuce Cradles

A good source of protein.

The new year is the perfect time to start a healthy routine, but between work, kids and errands, there just doesn’t seem to be enough time.

These sweet and sour lettuce cradles are the answer to your busy schedule.
They’re quick to make yet healthy, and they’re a good source of protein to satisfy your hunger.

 

 

 

Ingredients:

Sauce

2 TBSP oyster-flavored sauce
2 TBSP light soy sauce
2 tsp rice wine or dry sherry
1 TBSP brown sugar
¼ tsp garlic powder
¼ tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp ground white pepper

Stir in a small bowl to mix well. Set aside.

Meat

1 tsp canola oil
1 lb. ground chicken breast or turkey breast

Place skillet over high heat. Add canola oil, then ground chicken. Stir and cook between 4 and 5 minutes, or until meat is no longer pink. Remove meat from skillet and set aside. Wipe pan with paper towel, return pan to heat.

Vegetables

1 tsp canola oil
1 medium carrot, grated
⅓ cup canned water chestnuts, minced
2 green onions, chopped

Add canola oil. Add vegetables and stir until they soften. Add cooked meat, then the sauce. Stir until evenly coated. Spoon mixture onto lettuce leaf.

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Recipe: Southwest Vegetarian Chili

The nutrition you need in one dish.

This vegetarian chili recipe is easy to prepare, it will keep you full and warm, and will deliver the nutrition your body needs in one dish.

It’s that time of the year when the weather turns from hot to cold and those chilly nights call for something to keep you warm. This vegetarian chili recipe is easy to prepare, it will keep you full and warm, and will deliver the nutrition your body needs in one dish.

While there’s no meat, it’s prepared with quinoa and loaded with vegetables. The corn, chili powder, cumin, garlic and onions will add that Southwest flavor you’re looking for. So grab your slow cooker, get comfy and get ready to play your favorite movie, while the smell of this recipe will make you go OLÉ.

Ingredients:

2 ¼ cups vegetable broth
½ cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed if not pre-rinsed
1 (15-ounce) can black beans
1 (15-ounce) can fire-roasted tomatoes
2 cups frozen corn kernels
1 green bell pepper, chopped
½ medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 TBSP chili powder
1 ½ tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp oregano
Toppings:  chopped green onion, avocado slices

Place all ingredients in a crock pot and stir to combine. Cook on high for 2 ½ to 3 hours, or on low for 5 to 6 hours; check the last hour or so and add liquid as needed. Makes 6 servings.

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Recipe: Sherry-Braised Chicken and Mushrooms

Nutritious seared chicken.

This protein-packed, sherry-braised chicken and mushroom recipe is nutritious and ready in less than 30 minutes.

Between family obligations, kids’ homework, errands and appointments, today is harder than ever to find time to cook. This recipe combines seared chicken with mushrooms for a healthy and quick meal that will satisfy your hunger, and it will provide all the protein you need in less than 30 minutes.

The combination of dry sherry and mushrooms will create the perfect flavor to make your mouth water. Pair it with a spinach salad and brown rice and have a healthy, complete meal for any night of the week.

25 g protein/400-calorie meal
(Divide into 4 servings.)
40 g protein/600-calorie meal
(Divide into 3 servings.)
1 lb. Chicken breast tenders
Salt and pepper to taste
Small amount of flour for dredging
2 TBSP Olive oil
½ lb. Fresh mushrooms, thinly sliced
½ Small onion, halved and thinly sliced
2 Celery stalks, thinly sliced on a diagonal
 ¼ cup  Chicken broth
 ¼ cup Dry sherry or white wine
 ¼ cup Dried tarragon

Spread flour on a flat work surface. Dip chicken in flour on both sides, set aside, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, then add oil. When hot, add chicken in a single layer and brown on one side. Turn chicken over, continue cooking until cooked through, about 6-7 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

Add mushrooms, onion and celery to skillet. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are tender, about 5-7 minutes. Add broth, sherry and tarragon, and raise heat to high. Cook and stir until sauce is reduced and thickened to a few tablespoons, about 2 minutes. Return chicken to the pan and stir gently to coat with the sherry glaze.

Suggestion: Complete your meal with a spinach salad and brown rice. See Meal Builder for amounts for your Plan.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Four Ways to Declutter Your Diet

Get rid of the calorie clutter in your beverages.

Clean eating is trendy, but maybe you just need to declutter instead.

The phrase “clean eating” is pretty popular these days, but the concept isn’t really new.  In general, clean eating means eating foods that are fairly close to their natural state – that is, minimally processed – and getting rid of the excess ‘clutter’ in the form of a lot of added fats, sugars, salt and unnecessary additives.  Cooking foods at home and sourcing fresh, local ingredients is often part of the mix, too.  Overall, clean eating is meant to call more awareness to what we’re putting in our bodies.

It’s a great concept, but let’s not get carried away.  First of all, no one would argue that whole, unprocessed foods without packaging or labels are anything but good choices.  But creating a daily diet made up of only those foods might be intimidating to those who simply need to get a meal on the table at the end of a busy day.  Besides, there are plenty of healthy, wholesome – and yes, even ‘clean’ – foods that come in packages;  frozen loose pack veggies and fruits, canned tuna, salmon or beans, brown rice or whole grain pasta, just to name a few.

Some people take the concept of clean eating a little further, and decide to jump-start their regimen with a short fast.  Some say it feels like they’re giving their system a fresh start – kind of like cleaning out your closets or changing the oil in your car.  Fasting for a couple of days probably won’t do you any harm as long as you’re healthy and you keep yourself well-hydrated..

But keep in mind that our bodies naturally clean and detoxify every day.  We eliminate and neutralize not only via the digestive tract, but the liver, kidneys, lungs and skin get into the act, too.  As long as you take good care of your body and provide it with plenty of nourishing foods, it will take care of you.

So if you’re already eating plenty of fruits and veggies (even if they’ve been frozen), whole  grains (yep, even those that come packaged in a plastic bag) and lean proteins (even those that come from a can), your diet might be pretty clean already.  And even if you’re not eating this way, maybe you don’t need to do a “clean sweep” – perhaps a little “decluttering” is all it takes.

How to Declutter Your Diet

  • Read food labels to help you ditch extra sugar, salt and fat. You’ve heard it before, but it’s generally true – shorter ingredients lists usually mean fewer unwanted additives and more wholesome products.  Check labels for added fats, salt and sugar, and do your best to choose items that have minimal amounts added.  For example, choose plain yogurt rather than pre-sweetened, choose plain frozen vegetables rather than those with sauces added, look for whole grain breads or cereals with little to no added sugar.
  • Lose the refined starches and up your fruit and veggie intake. This sounds so simple, but it’s one of the best things you can do to improve the overall quality of your diet. When you make a point to include a fruit or vegetable at every meal, it “squeezes out” many of the unwanted foods and ingredients you might otherwise eat.  Swap sugary, fatty ice cream for a delicious bowl of berries, have a side salad with your sandwich instead of fries, or try snacking on baby carrots and hummus instead of chips.
  • Get rid of the calorie clutter in your beverages. When it comes to added calories, beverages are – for many people – their undoing.  Between sugary sodas, fruit juices (yes, even 100%, fresh-pressed, all-organic!), alcoholic beverages and fancy coffee drinks, it’s not hard to take in hundreds of calories a day from beverages alone.  Plain tea is a great alternative because it can be drunk hot or cold, it has no calories, and has naturally-occurring compounds that may offer some health benefits, too.
  • Clear the clutter from your fridge, freezer and pantry. A little kitchen ‘spring cleaning’ can really help you declutter your diet.  Fill your pantry with high-fiber whole grains (like 100% whole wheat pasta, bread, cereals and flour, as well as foods like quinoa, millet and brown rice) instead of the refined stuff. Stock up on beans and canned tomatoes instead of prepared spaghetti sauces or soups that are high in salt. Stock your refrigerator and freezer with plain fruits and veggies, rather than those with sugary syrups or salty, fatty sauces. And keep some canned tuna or salmon on hand in the pantry, or frozen fish filets or chicken breasts in the freezer for quick, healthy (clean!) meals, rather than frozen chicken nuggets or breaded fish sticks.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Shrimp and Spinach Pasta Salad

Pasta and shrimps, a family-favorite dish.

Full of fresh ingredients, this pasta salad with shrimp will become a favorite dish in no time. Whole grain pasta to give you the right amount of carbs, shrimp to add protein, lots of greens to meet your vegetable needs, and olive oil with garlic to add lots of flavor will make this dish your perfect choice for a special occasion.  It’s a complete meal in no time, with 40 grams of protein and 600 calories.

 

 

25 g / 400

Protein (approx.) / calories (approx.)

40 g / 600

Protein (approx.) / calories (approx.)

½ TBSP ½ TBSP Olive oil
2 tsp 2 tsp Balsamic vinegar
Dash Dash Garlic powder or ½ clove fresh garlic, minced
¼ tsp ¼ tsp Dried basil
Any amount Any amount Salt and pepper to taste
4 cups 6 cups Baby spinach leaves
1 cup 1 cup Raw vegetables, diced (bell pepper, cucumber, red onion, tomato)
1 cup 2 cups Chopped, cooked and chilled vegetables (eggplant, zucchini, broccoli)
3 oz. 5 oz. Cooked shrimp
½ cup 1 cup Cooked whole grain pasta
1 TBSP 1 TBSP Parmesan Cheese

In a mixing bowl large enough to hold all the ingredients, whisk together the oil, vinegar, garlic, basil, salt and pepper. Add spinach, vegetables, shrimp and pasta and toss well. Top with Parmesan cheese.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

Grilled Chicken, Broccoli and Quinoa Salad

Healthy green meal.

Fluffy and soft quinoa, juicy and tender slices of chicken, broccoli cooked to perfection, and a hint of lemon juice will transform this salad into a healthy green meal with 25 to 40 grams of protein and 600 calories.

Every ingredient in this salad works together to create a dish full of flavor and with LOTS of protein.

 

25 g/400

Protein (approx.)/calories (approx.)

40 g/600

Protein (approx.)/calories (approx.)

1 TBSP 1 TBSP Olive oil
2 tsp 2 tsp Lemon juice
½ tsp ½ tsp Dijon-style mustard
Any amount Any amount Salt and pepper to taste
4 cups 6 cups Mixed leafy greens
1 cup 2 cups Broccoli florets, cooked and chilled Cooked quinoa, chilled
½ cup 3 oz. 1 cup Cooked chicken breast, thinly sliced

 

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Tempeh and Noodle Salad

Complete meal in a bowl.

Spice up your salad with this simple but delicious vegan recipe.

It’s a salad, but it’s also a complete healthy entrée. Made with fresh vegetables and delicious noodles, tender and juicy tempeh has 25 to 40 grams of protein, 600 calories and a lot of flavor. What else can you ask for?

25 g/400

Protein (approx.)/calories (approx.)

40 g/600

Protein (approx.)/calories (approx.)

1 tsp 1 tsp Sesame oil
2 tsp 2 tsp Canola oil
2 tsp 2 tsp Rice vinegar
1 tsp 1 tsp Low sodium soy sauce
Dash Dash Ground white pepper
½ cup 1 cup Cooked soba (buckwheat) noodles
1 1 Carrot, grated
2 2 Green onions, chopped
1 cup 2 cups Asparagus spears, cooked, chilled and chopped into 2-inch pieces
2 oz. 4 oz. Tempeh, crumbled
½ cup ½ cup Cooked edamame (green soybeans)

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

A Roast with the Most: Fall Harvest Veggies

Roasting veggies brings out their sweetness.

The change of seasons brings with it a new group of fruits and vegetables. Apples, root vegetables like carrots and sweet potatoes and all the cabbage family foods, like broccoli and cauliflower, are at their peak now. And many are great for roasting—one of my favorite fall cooking methods.

With the grilling season over, I start giving a lot more foods the roasting treatment. The oven’s dry heat will caramelize the natural sugars in foods and brings a depth of flavor to fruits and vegetables that summer grilling can’t touch.

Root Veggie Roast

If you’ve never roasted root vegetables, you should give it a try. Roasted carrots are particularly delicious. Toss them with a little olive oil and balsamic vinegar, sprinkle with salt and pepper, then spread out on a cookie sheet and roast at 425 degrees for about a half hour until they’re tender. The vinegar turns into a sticky, syrupy glaze that coats them irresistibly. You can give the same treatment to sweet potatoes or beets—tossing them with something tart before roasting, like lemon or lime juice, vinegar, or even pomegranate juice to contrast with their natural sweetness.

Roasted veggies make a great side dish, but on the off chance there are any leftovers, they’re great added to soups and stews. Or you can slice them up cold and dress with vinaigrette, or add to mixed greens to give some fall flavor to your tossed salad.

Cauliflower Power

I was never much of a cauliflower lover until I started roasting it; now it’s become a fall staple at my house. Roasting softens the strong flavor. The cauliflower gets sweeter, and the texture becomes almost meaty. I coat the florets and a sliced onion with a dash of olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper and curry powder and then roast. Broccoli and Brussels sprouts—other veggies that are often a hard sell—are also delicious roasted with some oil and garlic.

You can roast fruits, too. Fall apples are fantastic when they’re prepared this way. Pretty much any variety will do, and you don’t need to peel them. Just cut in halves or quarters, remove the core and spread them in a single layer on a cookie sheet, sprayed with nonstick spray and roast like you would the veggies. You can toss them with a little lemon juice, apple juice or, if you want, spices first. But if you start with tasty fresh apples, they’re really good on their own.

Here’s another fall favorite recipe:

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Garlic and Parmesan

Even those who think they don’t like Brussels sprouts will admit that these are delicious. Roasting quickly with high heat mellows the flavor, and the Brussels sprouts end up tender and sweet. Tossed with a little fresh garlic and parmesan cheese, they make a fantastic side dish. If you have any left over, refrigerate and add to a tossed green salad the next day.

1 pound fresh Brussels sprouts
2 Tablespoons + 2 teaspoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
2 Tablespoons parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet (large enough to hold sprouts in a single layer) with foil, and drizzle with 2 teaspoons of olive oil. Place baking sheet in the oven while you prepare the Brussels sprouts. Trim the ends of the Brussels sprouts and cut in half. Place in a medium bowl and add 2 Tablespoons olive oil, salt and pepper. Toss to coat with olive oil mixture. When oven is hot, toss sprouts onto prepared baking sheet. Roast for about 20 minutes or so, shaking the pan every 5 minutes until some of the outer leaves are nicely browned and crispy and sprouts are tender. Transfer Brussels sprouts to a serving bowl, add garlic and parmesan cheese and toss to coat.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com

3 ways to help your fruit and vegetables pack a nutrient punch!

3 ways to help your fruit and vegetables pack a nutrient punch! Herbalife nutrition adviceThe way you select, store and prepare your fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards locking in the most nutrition – and will help you get the most nutritional benefit from the fruits and vegetables that you eat. This week, I’m looking at how you can lock in the nutrients in fruit and vegetables.

In order to keep the most nutrients in your fruits and vegetables, it’s sometimes helpful to understand how those nutrients can get lost in the first place. Fruits and vegetables can lose some of their nutritional value if they’re not properly handled.

For example, exposure to air, light and water can cause the loss of some nutrients, while short cooking times at moderate temperatures helps to keep nutrients in. And, in some cases, the way you prepare your foods can even make nutrients more usable by the body.

How to Shop for Fruits and Vegetables to Keep Nutrients In

Choosing the freshest fruits and vegetables is the first step in making sure the nutrients are locked in. The freshest fruits and vegetables are easy to spot – they’re free of blemishes and soft spots, they’re firm, and their colors are bright rather than dull. And, the freshest fruits and vegetables will have had the least exposure to air, light and water – all of which can cause nutrient losses.

Buying fruits and vegetables in season is a good idea, too. When you buy fruits and vegetables out of season, they’ve had a long way to travel from the farm to your fork – time in which valuable nutrients can be lost. If you’re fortunate to have a farmer’s market available to you, try to take advantage. In most cases, the fruits and vegetables are fresher and more locally sourced, which means less chance of nutrient losses.

When fresh fruits and vegetables aren’t available, keep in mind that frozen fruits and veggies actually retain their nutrients quite well – in some cases, frozen produce may actually offer more nutrition than fresh. For one thing, fruits and vegetables that are headed for the freezer case are usually picked at their peak of ripeness – a time when they’re most nutrient-packed. And they’re processed very quickly after picking and then flash-frozen, which locks in freshness and nutrients.

How to Prepare Fruits and Vegetables to Keep Nutrients In

When it’s time to prepare, lightly wash – but don’t soak – your fruits and vegetables. If the first utensil you tend to grab is your peeler, you might want to reconsider. The skins and peels of fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fiber. There’s no need to peel foods like apples, potatoes, carrots and cucumbers – and even foods that we usually do peel, like eggplant or kiwifruit – have edible skins. With citrus fruits, grate some of the tangy zest into salads and cooked vegetables to get a healthy dose of antioxidants, and don’t pare away the spongy white interior of the citrus peel – it’s full of water-soluble fiber.

Watch what you cut away, too. There’s more vitamin C and calcium in broccoli stems than the florets, more nutrients in asparagus stalks than the tips, and the hard center core of a pineapple has the highest concentration of bromelain, a natural enzyme which aids digestion.

Some nutrients – particularly, a group of antioxidants known as carotenoids – are more available for the body when foods are lightly processed through chopping or cooking.

The carotenoid lycopene for example – which gives tomatoes their red color – is more readily usable by the body when it’s obtained from cooked tomatoes than it is from raw. And your body will take up more lutein (a carotenoid that gives the yellow-green color to foods like spinach and kiwifruit) from chopped spinach than it will from whole spinach leaves.

A tiny amount of fat helps with the absorption of carotenoids, too, so a few slices of avocado in your spinach salad, or a little olive oil in your tomato sauce will boost your uptake.

How to Cook Fruits and Vegetables to Keep Nutrients In

When it’s time to cook vegetables (or fruits), the key to retaining nutrients is to use methods that require the least water. Steaming is one of the best techniques. Since the food never comes in contact with the water, steaming helps to preserve precious water-soluble B vitamins and vitamin C.

Microwaving also uses very little water and – despite popular misconception – microwaving does not destroy nutrients. With either method, use as little water as you can. The other advantage to these methods is that they’re quick – shorter cooking times help preserve nutrients. For this reason, stir-frying your vegetables is also a good option to lock nutrients in.

Pairing your seasonings with your vegetables can boost nutrition, too, since the thousands of different antioxidants in plant foods work together to protect your health. So add garlic to your broccoli, lemon peel to your green beans, or parsley to your carrots. Along with a flavor boost, you’ll get more nutritional value from your vegetables, too.

Find out more at: http://www.DiscoverHerbalife.com